John Murray

  • SLOUGH HOUSE Nouv.

    SLOUGH HOUSE

    Mick Herron

    I enjoyed Slough House tremendously. Witty, clever and horribly on point. Lots to laugh about while being careful not to miss a word. This isn''t a book to skim read

  • BLOOD AND OIL - MOHAMMED BIN SALMAN S RUTHLESS QUEST FOR GLOBAL POWER: THE EXPLOSIVE Nouv.

    Bradley Hope (Author) Bradley Hope, based in London, is the New York Times bestselling co-author of Billion Dollar Whale and covers finance and malfeasance for the Wall Street Journal . Before that he spent six years as a Middle East correspondent. Hope is a Pulitzer Prize finalist and Gerald Loeb Award winner. Justin Scheck (Author) Justin Scheck, based in New York, has worked at the Wall Street Journal since 2007, covering white collar crime across four continents. He has been writing about Saudi Arabia since 2016.

  • ' Milkman meets Derry Girls . A cracking read' Sinead Moriarty 'A thrillingly fresh, provocative and touching voice' Marian Keyes 'Bawdy yet beautiful, full of everyday tragedy, absurdity and truth. I grew extraordinarily attached to Majella' Sara Baume Routine makes Majella's world small but change is about to make it a whole lot bigger. *Stuff Majella knows* -God doesn't punish men with baldness for wearing ladies' knickers -Banana-flavoured condoms taste the same as nutrition shakes -Not everyone gets a volley of gunshots over their grave as they are being lowered into the ground *Stuff Majella doesn't know* -That she is autistic -Why her ma drinks -Where her da is Other people find Majella odd. She keeps herself to herself, she doesn't like gossip and she isn't interested in knowing her neighbours' business. But suddenly everyone in the small town in Northern Ireland where she grew up wants to know all about hers. Since her da disappeared during the Troubles, Majella has tried to live a quiet life with her alcoholic mother. She works in the local chip shop (Monday-Saturday, Sunday off), wears the same clothes every day (overalls, too small), has the same dinner each night (fish and chips, nuked in the microwave) and binge watches Dallas (the best show ever aired on TV) from the safety of her single bed. She has no friends and no boyfriend and Majella thinks things are better that way. But Majella's safe and predictable existence is shattered when her grandmother dies and as much as she wants things to go back to normal, Majella comes to realise that maybe there is more to life. And it might just be that from tragedy comes Majella's one chance at escape.

  • DOMINICANA

    Angie Cruz

    'A thrilling, necessary, and unforgettable portrait of what it means to be an immigrant' Patricia Engel, author of The Veins of The Ocean and Vida ' Dominicana is beautiful, engaging, and cuts right to the heart of what it is to be a dutiful young female from a poor country who is bright in every sense of the word, full of love and hope' Mary Gaitskill, author of The Mare a nd Veronica Fifteen-year-old Ana Cancion never dreamed of moving to America, the way the girls she grew up with in the Dominican countryside did. But when Juan Ruiz proposes and promises to take her to New York City, she must say yes. It doesn't matter that he is twice her age, that there is no love between them. Their marriage is an opportunity for her entire close-knit family to eventually immigrate. So on New Year's Day, 1965, Ana leaves behind everything she knows and becomes Ana Ruiz, a wife confined to a cold six-floor walk-up in Washington Heights. Lonely and miserable, Ana hatches a reckless plan to escape. But at the bus terminal, she is stopped by Cesar, Juan's free-spirited younger brother, who convinces her to stay. As the Dominican Republic slides into political turmoil, Juan returns to protect his family's assets, leaving Cesar to take care of Ana. Suddenly, Ana is free to take English lessons at a local church, lie on the beach at Coney Island, dance with Cesar at the Audubon Ballroom, and imagine the possibility of a different kind of life in America. When Juan returns, Ana must decide once again between her heart and her duty to her family. In bright, musical prose that reflects the energy of New York City, Dominicana is a vital portrait of the immigrant experience and the timeless coming-of-age story of a young woman finding her voice in the world.

  • 'Game-changing ... Read it!' - Mariana Mazzucato In a world of epic, overlapping crises, Stephanie Kelton is an indispensable source of moral clarity ... the truths that she teaches about money, debt, and deficits give us the tools we desperately need to build a safe future for all. Read it - then put it to use. - Naomi Klein The leading thinker and most visible public advocate of modern monetary theory - the freshest and most important idea about economics in decades - delivers a radically different, bold, new understanding for how to build a just and prosperous society. Any ambitious proposal - ranging from fixing crumbling infrastructure to Medicare for all or preventing the coming climate apocalypse - inevitably sparks questions: how can we afford it? How can we pay for it? Stephanie Kelton points out how misguided those questions really are by using the bold ideas of modern monetary theory (MMT), a fundamentally different approach to using our resources to maximize our potential as a society. We've been thinking about government spending in the wrong ways, Kelton argues, on both sides of the political aisle. Everything that both liberal/progressives and conservatives believe about deficits and the role of money and government spending in the economy is wrong, especially the fear that deficits will endanger long-term prosperity. Through illuminating insights about government debt, deficits, inflation, taxes, the financial system, and financial constraints on the federal budget, Kelton dramatically changes our understanding of how to best deal with important issues ranging from poverty and inequality to creating jobs and building infrastructure. Rather than asking the self-defeating question of how to pay for the crucial improvements our society needs, Kelton guides us to ask: which deficits actually matter? What is the best way to balance the risk of inflation against the benefits of a society that is more broadly prosperous, safer, cleaner, and secure? With its important new ways of understanding money, taxes, and the critical role of deficit spending, MMT busts myths that prevent us from taking action because we can't get beyond the question of how to pay for it. 'The best book on rethinking economics that anyone will find right now.' - Richard Murphy, Political Economist and author of The Joy of Tax

  • We all want to be healthier, stronger and live longer, but what really works? From stress to saturated fats, HIIT to HRT, veganism to vitamins, This Book Could Save Your Life debunks the fads and explores the real science of better health. What's the best way to lose weight (and keep it off)? How can you ensure a good night's sleep? What are the real superfoods? How can you minimise the risks of getting diabetes, cancer or Alzheimer's? And how can you slow the ageing process? Cutting through confusing statistics and terrifying headlines, here is the truth about dieting, drugs, 10,000 steps a day, bacon, calorie-counting, coffee, dairy, sleep, fibre, hangovers, salt, sugar, cardio, sunscreen, statins, vitamins, and much more. Full of the latest research and ground-breaking evidence, packed with useful advice, this book really could save your life.

  • One of the most compelling international dramas of the 20th century and an unforgettable saga of survival, technological innovation, and breathtaking human physical achievement-all set against the backdrop of a world headed toward war. While tension steadily rose between European powers in the 1930s, a different kind of battle was raging across the Himalayas. Contingents from Great Britain, Nazi Germany, and the United States had set up rival camps at the base of the mountains, all hoping to become recognized as the fastest, strongest, and bravest climbers in the world. Carried on across nearly the entire sweep of the Himalayas, this contest involved not only the greatest mountain climbers of the era, but statesmen and millionaires, world-class athletes and bona fide eccentrics, scientists and generals, obscure villagers and national heroes. Centered in the 1930s, with one brief, shining postwar coda, the contest was a struggle between hidebound traditionalists and unknown innovators, one that featured new techniques and equipment, unbelievable courage and physical achievement, and unparalleled valor. And death. One Himalayan peak alone, Nanga Parbat in Kashmir, claimed twenty-five lives in less than three years. Climbing the Himalayas was the Greatest Generation's moonshot--one shrouded in the onset of war, interrupted by it, and then fully accomplished. A gritty, fascinating history that promises to enrapture fans of Hampton Side, Jon Krakauer, and Laura Hillenbrand, The World Beneath Their Feet brings this forgotten story back to life.

  • THE AGE OF A.I. - AND OUR HUMAN FUTURE Nouv.

  • There have been other biographies of Roger Federer, but never one with this kind of access to the man himself, his support team, and the most prominent figures in the game, including such rivals as Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic, and Andy Roddick. In THE MASTER, New York Times correspondent Christopher Clarey sits down with Federer and those closest to him to tell the story of the greatest player in men''s tennis. Roger Federer has often made it look astonishingly easy through the decades: carving backhands, gliding to forehands, leaping for overheads and, in his most gravity-defying act, remaining high on a pedestal in a world of sports rightfully flooded with cynicism. But his path from temperamental, bleach-blond teenager with dubious style sense to one of the greatest, most self-possessed and elegant of competitors has been a long-running act of will, not destiny. He not only had a great gift. He had grit. Christopher Clarey, one of the top international sportswriters working today, has covered Federer since the beginning of his professional career. He was in Paris on the Suzanne Lenglen Court for Federer''s first Grand Slam match and has interviewed him exclusively more than any other journalist since his rise to prominence. Here, Clarey focuses on the pivotal people, places, and moments in Federer''s long and rich career: reporting from South Africa, South America, the Middle East, four Grand Slam tournaments, and Federer''s native Switzerland. It has been a journey like no other player''s, rife with victories and a few crushing defeats, one that has redefined enduring excellence and made Federer a sentimental favorite worldwide. THE MASTER tells the story of Federer''s life and career on both an intimate and grand scale, in a way no one else could possibly do.

  • THE NUTMEG''S CURSE Nouv.

    THE NUTMEG''S CURSE

    Amitav Ghosh

    ''One of the finest writers of his generation'' Financial Times Before the 18th century, every single nutmeg in the world originated around a group of small volcanic islands east of Java, known as the Banda Islands. As the nutmeg made its way across the known world, they became immensely valuable - in 16th century Europe, just a handful could buy a house. It was not long before European traders became conquerors, and the indigenous Bandanese communities - and the islands themselves - would pay a high price for access to this precious commodity. Yet the bloody fate of the Banda Islands forewarns of a threat to our present day. Amitav Ghosh argues that the nutmeg''s violent trajectory from its native islands is revealing of a wider colonial mindset which justifies the exploitation of human life and the natural environment, and which dominates geopolitics to this day. Written against the backdrop of the pandemic and the Black Lives Matter protests, and interweaving discussions on everything from climate change, the migrant crisis, and the animist spirituality of indigenous communities around the world, The Nutmeg''s Curse offers a sharp critique of Western society, and reveals the profoundly remarkable ways in which human history is shaped by non-human forces.

  • FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS ABOUT THE UNIVERSE Nouv.

    Why can''t I travel back in time? Is there another version of me out there? Will time ever stop? What would a bowl of Higgs bosons taste like? Inspired by their hugely popular pop-science podcast (over one million downloads) in Frequently Asked Questions about the Universe , physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist Jorge Cham break down the funniest, most outrageous and most puzzling questions about our universe. With their bestselling and award-winning signature blend of humour, physics and clear explanations, Daniel and Jorge give unforgettable, fascinating and highly illustrated answers to the mind-bending questions you''ve always wanted to understand.

  • TRUST - AMERICA''S BEST CHANCE Nouv.

    Pete Buttigieg, born in Indiana in 1982, is the former two-term mayor of South Bend and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate. A Rhodes scholar and US Navy veteran, Buttigieg, whose first book, Shortest Way Home , became a New York Times best-seller, was educated at Harvard and Oxford. He and his husband, Chasten Buttigieg, live in South Bend, Indiana.

  • JUNGLE-NAMA Nouv.

    JUNGLE-NAMA

    Amitav Ghosh

    Amitav Ghosh was born in Calcutta in 1956. He grew up in Bangladesh, Sri Lanka and India. He studied at the universities of Delhi and Oxford and published the first of eight novels, The Circle of Reason in 1986. He currently divides his time between Calcutta, Goa and Brooklyn. The first novel in his Ibis trilogy, Sea of Poppies , was shortlisted for the Man Booker prize.>

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