Leila Simona Talani

  • With contributions from a range of expert scholars in European economics, politics and social policy, this edited collection analyses the crisis in Europe by exploring the structural asymmetries of the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) and European monetary integration. Structured in two parts, the chapters in this book discuss the impact of the global financial crisis on the Euro area; the failed implementation of the Lisbon Strategy; wage imbalances in the European labour market; the development of EU financial regulation; the Greek debt crisis; and the relationship between Italy and the EMU. The conclusion to the book puts forward a potential way out of the European crisis and argues that the correct measures, thus far, have not been taken to bolster financial stability.
    In Europe in Crisis, Talani and her contributors aim to identify the impact of the crisis on the future of the EMU and the EU project as a whole.

  • This book proposes an alternative political economy framework in which to analyse the question of the credibility of international economic agreements, in general, and monetary arrangements in particular. The focus is on European monetary arrangements, from the establishment of the European Monetary System to the crisis of the Euro-zone. The analysis is predicated around the political economy of Italy's access and permanence in the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). The author argues that the case of Italy, which made a concerted effort to join the EMU in the first wave, is particularly striking. Support for the single currency was widespread when it was introduced, yet something went wrong. Nowadays, its participation to the European monetary integration process cannot be easily taken for granted, especially after the vicissitudes of the Euro-zone crisis.

  • The global financial and economic crisis has brought about many effects that are still difficult to interpret univocally. This book studies the consequences of the crisis on Europe by examining the effects on the European institutional setup, governance and architecture and by studying in detail the different member countries.

  • Challenging the assumptions of `mainstream' International Political Economy (IPE), this Handbook demonstrates the considerable value of critical theory to the discipline through a series of cutting-edge studies. The field of IPE has always had an inbuilt vocation within Historical Materialism, with an explicit ambition to make sense, from a critical standpoint, of the capitalist mode of production as a world system of sometimes paradoxically and sometimes smoothly overlapping states and markets. Having spearheaded the growth of a vigorous critical scholarship in the 1960s and 1970s, however, Marxism and neo-Gramscian approaches became increasingly marginalized over the course of the 1980s. The authors respond to the exposure of limits to mainstream contemporary scholarship in the wake of the onset of the Global Financial Crisis, and provide a comprehensive overview of the field of Critical International Political Economy. Problematizing socioeconomic and political structures, and considering these as potentially transitory and subject to change, the contributors aim not simply to understand a world of conflict, but furthermore to uncover the ways in which purportedly objective analyses reflect the interests of those in positions of privilege and power.

     

  • Firmly rooted in the International Political Economy (IPE) tradition, this book addresses the negative consequences of globalisation, what is termed here the `dark side of globalisation'. It explores different definitions of globalisation, whether the globalisation we have seen since the 1970s is substantially new, and to what extent it can be governed. Building on these foundations, the work assesses the prospects for de-globalisation. By focusing on this dark side of globalistion, the authors show how the global economic crisis, and its various local and sectorial manifestations, intensified - rather than generated - existing trends. This scholarship provides an account of the current predicament that is both more complex and more persuasive than the opposition between globalisation and de-globalisation.

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